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Converse x Winter Coldness

Due to a couple of different, crazy coincidences yesterday I pretended for a few hours to be an actor. For a short film I cried fake tears and played an annoyed Rock musician.

 

Obviously I was also wearing the iconographic outfit of an indie rocker: Sleeveless band t-shirt, tight, washed-out jeans, and worn-out “Chucks” by CONVERSE. Especially the latter belong to the standard equipment of any musician and as such are considered good etiquette in the backstage rooms and stages around the world.

 

Unfortunately though we also shot – authentic! authentic! – in an old run-down, moldy bar that wasn’t even remotely heated. Considering the current cold weather in Berlin (below zero Celsius!) it was a rather unpleasant stay. The cold crept through those rubber soles of the ‘Chucks’ within Nano seconds so that I had to live with the fear of my toes – trés Reinhold Messneresque – would just freeze off at any second. This immediately prompted the question: Aren’t there any boots by CONVERSE? Does it have to be the classical ‘Chuck Taylor’ even in wintertime?

 

The answer is being widely communicated already at the moment: No, it doesn’t have to be. There are actually boots by CONVERSE, with a thick sole, insolated, made of heavy leather and a guarantee to be cold resistant. And to make sure everyone is aware of it, the company even set up a Tumblr blog for it. Awesome! Really awesome, even!

On a less awesome note, the CONVERSE Tumblr had not reached the stylist of the movie yet. This should change now. This blog entry is a service to humanity – or rather a service to freezing amateur actors who would very much like to keep their toes.

Von: Jakob

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Cathy Horyn >>> Hedi Slimane – a Conciliation?

Cathy Horn has been the critical voice of the New York Times for a long time. Her, unusual for the industry, critics have not always brought her friends. With the designer of Saint Laurent, Hedi Slimane, she still is in a clinch.

After a critical article by Horyn, Hedi Slima published a tweet, in which he complains, that her critic is unprofessional, that she has always preferred Raf Simons (oh dear, oh dear) and that she is never going to be invited to another Saint Laurent fashion show.

Back then, in her sum-up about the Parisian fashion shows of the season, in which she was not allowed to take a seat for the New York Times at SAINT LAURENT, Horyn wrote the following sentence about Slimane’s work at SL:

‘With the decision, to remove the ‘Yves’ out of ‘Yves Saint Laurent’, Slimane cut the connection to the founder of the brand, and everything he stood for, good taste and female power’

The sharp-tongued Horyn is writing in a current article, that she wrote for the T magazine, in comparison, in a conciliable way about Slimane.

In ‘The Signs of Time’ she is describing the upcoming commercialisation of high-fashion labels. What used to be a ‘No-Go’, is becoming place. Wearable, not necessarily innovative, fashion.

Slimane and his fashion for Saint Laurent, have been named as the example for the changes in the article:

“It’s as though he refuses to strive for the standard goals of a luxury designer — to make modern, conceptual or intellectually resonating clothes. Instead, he makes straightforward commercial fashion that a woman can instantly relate to. I’m no fan of Slimane’s, but he’s clever. In two years as creative chief, he has barely broken a sweat as he fetches another pussy bow from the ’60s time capsule. Last year, Saint Laurent led Kering’s three biggest luxury brands in revenue growth with an 18 percent rise, beating Gucci and Bottega Veneta. He has also defeated his critics, who no doubt sensed the futility of continuing to point out that he doesn’t seem to be trying very hard to be inventive.”

Fashion is an effigy of our times. And, that must be acknowledged by Horyn, Slimane is in tune with the times with his work for Saint Laurent. With his simplification for fashion, his triumphal branding.

Slimane is more of a marketing-genius than a designer. Maybe that is the future. Is the genius designer, who is craving after innovation, always searching after something ‘new’ a discontinued model? Is it going to be the marketing-experts, who are ruling the future of fashion. Currently it seems like it.

You can read the complete article by Horyn here.

Von: Julian

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